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Enlarge this image U.S. goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher lies injured as Becky Sauerbrunn checks on her during the Women's semifinal match between USA and Canada on Monday at the Tokyo Olympic Games at Kashima Stadium. Francois Nel/Getty Images Francois Nel/Getty Images TOKYO — U.S. goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher will not play in Thursday's Olympic bronze medal women's soccer match. Naeher exited Monday's semifinal game against Canada with an injury. In the 22nd minute, Naeher leapt for a ball, bumped into U.S. defender Julie Ertz and landed awkwardly. U.S. Soccer says Naeher "suffered a hyperextension of her right knee and a bone contusion." She remained on the ground while the team's medical staff attended to her. Naeher played a few more minutes but visibly winced and raised her hand to be substituted out when she next kicked the ball. U.S. goalkeeper Adrianna Franch replaced her for the rest of the game. Canada defeated the U.S. 1-0 to advance to Friday's gold medal match against Sweden. U.S. Soccer said in a news release that Naeher had an MRI after the game which showed no ligament damage. "I'm disappointed I won't be able to be on the field Thursday with my teammates competing for a medal, but I know this group will bounce back from a tough loss," Naeher said. She's expected to be out for several weeks. The U.S. team, which is top-ranked and reigning Women's World Cup champions, will take on Australia for the bronze medal on Thursday at 4 a.m. ET. The teams played to a scoreless draw when they met earlier in the tournament. Enlarge this image Alyssa Naeher stands with crutches following her injury after Canada defeated the U.S. Francois Nel/Getty Images Francois Nel/Getty Images Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Tue, Aug 03, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Norway's Karsten Warholm reacts after winning the men's 400 meter hurdles final on Tuesday at the Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Petr David Josek/AP Petr David Josek/AP TOKYO — We'll be talking about this race for years to come. Two of the three fastest competitors ever in the event were on the starting line of the men's 400 meter hurdles final at the Tokyo Olympics — and both beat the previous world record time by a wide margin. Norway's Karsten Warholm took gold, breaking his own world record with a time of 45.94. He smashed it by almost three-quarters of a second. Behind him was Rai Benjamin of the U.S., with a blazing fast 46.17. Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Tue, Aug 03, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson promoted COVID-19 vaccinations at a community town hall at Arkansas State University Mountain Home (ASUMH) in Mountain Home, Arkansas, on July 16. Arkansas is one of several states that has passed laws prohibiting vaccine requirements. Liz Sanders/Bloomberg via Getty Images Liz Sanders/Bloomberg via Getty Images As COVID-19 cases surge, the federal government and some private employers are requiring their workers to show proof of vaccination. Plus, certain cities and localities are once again requiring masks indoors. Some states, however, are not just ordering more precautions, but already moving to stop vaccination mandates in the future. Hemi Tewarson of the National Academy for State Health Policy is tracking state legislatures for such bills, and spoke to Morning Edition's A Martínez about what she's seeing. Notably: As of late last week, 9 states have enacted 11 laws with prohibitions on vaccine mandates (Arizona and Arkansas have each enacted two). They weren't all introduced or enacted at this stage of the pandemic — in fact, some were introduced back in February and March, and the most recent took effect in late June. Some of these laws are tied only to vaccinations that have emergency use authorization, so the prohibition will no longer apply if the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines get full approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The laws don't prevent officials from encouraging vaccinations, only from requiring it. So governors in these states are still pushing for people to roll up their sleeves, just not ordering it. The vast majority of these laws apply only to state and local governments, meaning private schools and employers in those states can still pass vaccine mandates. Companies like Google, Netflix, Morgan Stanley and The Washington Post have recently announced vaccine requirements for their employees. Other businesses are using incentives like time off, lotteries and reduction in health care insurance. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has this story on how private companies are navigating these decisions. This story originally appeared on the Morning Edition live blog. Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Mon, Aug 02, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS