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Enlarge this image Josephine Baker poses in Paris in the 1930s. HARCOURT/AFP via Getty Images HARCOURT/AFP via Getty Images Josephine Baker, the American-born entertainer and civil rights activist who first achieved fame in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s, was given France's highest honor on Tuesday when she was inducted into the French Pantheon, the nation's mausoleum of heroes. Enlarge this image Singer and dancer Josephine Baker, sitting on a tiger rug, circa 1925. Hulton Archive/Getty Images Hulton Archive/Getty Images Baker is the first performing artist, first Black woman and first American to be honored with a Pantheon induction — a move whose time, her supporters say, has come. French President Emmanuel Macron presided over Tuesday evening's official ceremony, broadcast live on French television and which included Baker's family members, politicians, Monaco's Prince Albert II and crowds of spectators. "She broke down barriers," Macron said. "She became part of the hearts and minds of French people ... Josephine Baker, you enter the Pantheon because while you were born American, but deep down there was no one more French than you." Some 80 other luminaries, including Voltaire, Victor Hugo and Marie Curie, are among those buried in the Paris monument. Baker is buried in Monaco, where her body will remain. Her Pantheon presence is commemorated in a plaque on a cenotaph. C'est Joséphine Baker. pic.twitter.com/XjxFYcZMAO— Emmanuel Macron (@EmmanuelMacron) November 30, 2021 The idea of laying Baker to rest in the Pantheon was first proposed in 2013, and gained traction in more recent years as France reckons with racism, its colonial past and questions about the success of its model of social integration. Baker is widely admired in France, but the decision to induct her into the Pantheon has met with some controversy: Critics say that while Baker may have represented France's "universalist" approach — which technically does not identify citizens by race or ethnicity — honoring her does not erase often entrenched racism against French people of African or Arab origin. Baker landed in Paris at age 19 and quickly became a sensation Josephine Baker was born Freda Josephine McDonald in 1906 in St. Louis, Missouri. She started work cleaning houses at age eight. At nine, she attended her first live theater performance. "And she knew immediately that that was what she wanted to do," [...]
Tue, Nov 30, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Stocks tumbled on Tuesday as investors weighed the potential economic fallout from the new coronavirus variant. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down more than 600 points at noon ET. In testimony before the Senate Banking Committee, Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell warned that growing concern over the coronavirus, including the new omicron variant, could make people wary about returning to in-person jobs. That could slow the recovery of the labor market and prolong the supply-chain bottlenecks that have contributed to the highest inflation in more than three decades. Powell said elevated inflation is likely to continue well into next year. Fed policymakers are set to meet in about two weeks. Powell said by then, they may have more information about the possible health effects of the omicron variant and how it responds to existing vaccines. With rising price pressures, the central bank has begun to dial back its aggressive bond-buying program, which was put in place in the early part of the pandemic to support the financial markets. But Powell suggested that the process could be accelerated, so bond purchases would end a few months earlier than next summer. Ending the bond purchases early would give the Fed more flexibility to raise interest rates, if necessary, to keep inflation from spiraling out of control. Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Tue, Nov 30, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks during a news conference outside the Capitol in August. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images The phone call between Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., and Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., was meant to defuse tensions after the Republican made Islamophobic comments about the Democrat. Both congresswomen agree the call did not go well. The communication came after a video emerged of Boebert telling a Colorado audience a story about how she once shared an elevator with Omar. Boebert said she saw a U.S. Capitol Police officer running toward the elevator. "I looked to my left and there she is: Ilhan Omar. And I said, 'Well, she does not have a backpack — we should be OK.' " The audience laughed. She also referred to Omar as a member of the "Jihad Squad." Omar denied that the incident Boebert recounted ever took place. Omar, a progressive Democrat and one of only three Muslims serving in Congress, said she spoke with Boebert on Monday in the hopes of receiving a "direct apology." "Instead of apologizing for her Islamophobic comments and fabricated lies, Rep. Boebert refused to publicly acknowledge her hurtful and dangerous comments. She instead doubled down on her rhetoric, and I decided to end the unproductive call," Omar said in a statement. "I believe in engaging with those we disagree with respectfully, but not when that disagreement is rooted in outright bigotry and hate." Enlarge this image Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., listens during a news conference on Sept. 22. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images Boebert agreed the call did not go well. On her personal Instagram account, she gave her version of the call: "I never want anything I say to offend someone's religion, so I told [Omar] that," she said. "Even after I put out a public statement to that effect, she said she still wanted a public apology because what I had done wasn't good enough." On Friday, the far-right congresswoman tweeted an apology "to anyone in the Muslim community" offended by her comments, but not an apology to Omar. Instead, Boebert said, as Omar pushed for a direct and public apology, she said that Omar "should make an apology to the American people" for her past rhetoric. After that, Boebert said, Omar "hung up on me." Boebert also doubled down, saying she would put "America first, never sympathizing [...]
Mon, Nov 29, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
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