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Editor's note: This is a developing story; we'll provide updates as they become available.Police in Kissimmee, Fla., just south of Orlando, reported late Friday that two officers there had been shot. Both were killed, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs confirmed on Twitter.Heartbreaking loss of two of Kissimmee's finest officers. Please join in prayers for families, friends, and law enforcement.— Mayor Teresa Jacobs (@Mayor_Jacobs) August 19, 2017A suspect has been arrested, according to the Orlando Sentinel."There are no county or jurisdiction lines when it comes to our Law Enforcement Brotherhood," Osceola County Commissioner Fred Hawkins Jr. wrote in response to the shootings. There are no county or jurisdiction lines when it comes to our Law Enforcement Brotherhood. Thank U 4 the support & Prayers— Fred Hawkins, Jr. (@fhawkinsjr) August 19, 2017Florida Highway Patrol spokeswoman Sgt. Kim Montes told the Sentinel that one person was in custody.Details of the shootings, including whether the officers were on duty or responding to a call at the time, have not been released yet, the Sentinel reported.Further north in Jacksonville, the local sheriff's office also reported that two of their officers had been shot, with information about the circumstances or their conditions withheld until family members were notified.Let's block ads! (Why?) [...]
Sat, Aug 19, 2017
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Study authors found that, on average, demographically similar September-born children performed better than younger August-born students, all through their academic careers. gpointstudio/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide captiontoggle caption gpointstudio/Getty Images/iStockphoto Children who start school at an older age do better than their younger classmates and have better odds of attending college and graduating from an elite institution. That's according to a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Affairs.Many parents already delay enrolling their children in school, believing they'll do better if they're a bit older. It's sort of "academic red-shirting," says one of the study's authors, David Figlio, an economist at Northwestern University, using a term that originated in college athletics and refers to recruits who are held out of games for a year.The study focused on differences between Florida children born just before and after the Sept. 1 cutoff date for starting kindergarten. That means the youngest children in any class were born in August and the oldest in September of the previous year. Figlio and his co-authors found that, on average, demographically similar September-born children performed better than their younger August-born classmates, all through their academic careers.Previous studies have also concluded that older children do better in school, but there were still questions about whether the advantage continued beyond a few years. This new research found that the advantage extends through college. In an interview with NPR, Figlio said that if you look at test scores, the achievement gap could be equivalent to about 40 points on the 1600-point SAT.The age a child starts school could also affect college attendance and graduation rates. Among families in the middle socioeconomic group, the older, September-born kids were 2.6 percent more likely to attend college and 2.6 percent more likely to graduate from an elite university. On the downside, August-born children were 1 percent more likely to be incarcerated for juvenile crime. Figlio acknowledges these are not "massive differences," but he says they are "meaningful."Figlio said the study's most surprising finding was that the gap between August- and September-born children occurs at all socioeconomic levels and is not easily closed, even in high-income families. The Florida birth and education data allowed the researchers to compare the performance of August- and September-born children in the same families. Even in high-income families, says Figlio, there was a gap in achievement between children who started school at a young age and siblings who started when they were older.Figlio says that surprised him because he thought high-income families would have the resources needed to close the gap between siblings.There's no clear remedy to the problem, he says. But he believes educators and officials should look for solutions. Figlio says one possibility may be grouping same-age students in separate classes, rather than having classes where some children can be nearly a year younger than their oldest peers. He says that in the early primary years, the cognitive and social differences between children who are nearly a year apart can be very dramatic, and teaching for each group could be tailored to their development levels.Let's block ads! (Why?) [...]
Fri, Aug 18, 2017
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Police officers and rescuers in the Finnish city of Turku after several people were stabbed on Friday. Bernat Majo /AFP/Getty Images hide captiontoggle caption Bernat Majo /AFP/Getty Images Two people were killed in a stabbing attack in Turku, Finland, and police say they have apprehended a suspect after shooting him in the leg.Regional police forces said on Twitter that six other people were injured in the attack, which took place in the center of the city about 100 miles away from the capital, Helsinki. It wasn't immediately clear what condition they were in.Authorities did not immediately identify the attacker or state what his motivations may be. The Associated Press reports that Finland's YLE broadcaster quotes the county's top police chief Seppo Kolehmainen saying that "nothing is known about the motives ... or what precisely has happened in Turku."Police said the incident "was not being investigated as a terror attack, but that could change as new information comes to light," according to YLE.It's also not clear how many people took part in the attack. Local police say they are "searching for possible more perpetrators in Turku."They asked people to avoid the area in the center of the city, though according to YLE, by evening authorities said they "were confident that the centre of Turku was safe for the general public once again."Police presence has been ramped up around the country, and YLE quotes the interior minister saying that "surveillance of foreigners was to be stepped up at ports and airports."The Interior Ministry says the case has been turned over to the National Bureau of Investigation.The AP reports that witness Laura Laine described the attack to YLE: "We heard that a young woman was screaming. We saw a man on the square and a knife glittered. He was waving it in the air. I understood that he had stabbed someone."Another eyewitness, Jesse Brown, told the BBC: "I saw police shoot a person, a man I think. People were running and there was talk about a knife attack, possibly multiple perpetrators."Let's block ads! (Why?) [...]
Fri, Aug 18, 2017
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS