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Enlarge this image People walk past the Sol Tribe tattoo shop where two women were shot and killed and a man injured on Dec. 27 in Denver, Colo. It was the first in a series of shootings that claimed five lives across the area. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images Attorney General Merrick Garland on Friday said the federal government wants to create a "comprehensive" response to the scourge of gun crime that involves working more with cities and states. "At the Justice Department, we stand shoulder to shoulder with you in the fight against violent crime and we will use every tool at our disposal to protect our communities," Garland said in remarks to the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington on Friday. The number of murders in the U.S. jumped by nearly 30% in 2020 from 2019, according to the FBI, the largest single-year increase ever recorded. The Council on Criminal Justice think tank reported earlier this month that murders rose 7% last year, based on police data from large cities, with Indianapolis, Philadelphia, Portland and at least 10 other municipalities still seeing record numbers of homicides. Looking beyond officers on the street State and local police are on the front lines in the battle against gun violence, homicide and assault, and Quinton Lucas, mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, said that communities need a variety of help from the federal government. "The challenge of the last few years is that too much of the debate has been either-or," said Lucas, who chairs the mayors conference's Criminal and Social Justice Committee. "It is either law enforcement — police officers on the street and funding them — or you invest in programs in your community, violence interruption, cure violence models, etc." Kansas City saw 182 homicides in 2021, the second deadliest year in its history. Lucas said the Justice Department under former President Donald Trump flooded many cities with federal agents. Now Lucas wants another kind of flood. "Resources that help us fund more of our social work programs, particularly our work with young people, that's the sort of change we need from this administration," he said. "And I think mayors are waiting to see when that will happen because, Lord knows, the problem isn't easing up in any of our cities." Enlarge this image Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas addresses demonstrators with a bullhorn during a protest at the Country Club Plaza on May 31, 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. Jamie Squire/Getty Images [...]
Fri, Jan 21, 2022
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image European carriers are urging the European Union to alter so-called "use it or lose it" regulations forcing airlines to continue flying empty or near-empty flights. Frank Augstein/AP Frank Augstein/AP Kai Forsyth lived it up on a recent British Airways flight from London to Florida. The 19-year-old college freshman had the entire airplane to himself, with only the pilots and flight crew onboard keeping him company on the nearly 9-hour flight. "The cabin crew said I was the only person on board the flight," Forsyth wrote in a TikTok video about his trip on Jan. 9. Indeed, as the phone pans from left to right, a sea of empty seats fills the frame. @kaiforsyth @British Airways find this flight attendant 😂 he needs a promotion 🥳 #fyp #foryou #viral #fypシ #fy #foryourpage #foryoupage #uk #fly #britishairways ♬ Fortnite season 3 lobby music - Liam💨 Meanwhile, the crew appeared to dote on the solo traveler, treating him to an "unlimited" supply of airplane snacks and at least one flight attendant binged on popcorn and movies with Forsyth, he said. "It was eight hours so I set up a bed. Literally the comfiest I've ever been on a plane," he added. While the experience might have been a delight for Forsyth, so-called "ghost flights" — flights that carriers have to make if they want to hold on to their allocated routes and airport gates — have become a flashpoint for environmentalists across Europe. They're calling for regulatory changes to keep polluting planes from making flights that would normally be canceled while omicron has sent demand plummeting. Airline companies are also putting pressure on the European Union to adjust the rules until at least the autumn. According to European Commission guidelines, under the "80/20 rule," carriers must operate 80% of their allocated slot for at least 80% of the time. That was tweaked at the outset of the pandemic and more recently adjusted to 50%, but those figures still exceed the number of flights needed to meet current passenger demand. Additionally, the pre-pandemic rate is set to be reinstated by March 2022. Conservationists are trying to keep that from happening and have launched an online petition, saying, "'Ghost' flights are of no benefit to anyone. This is a needless, wasteful practice, and reforming historic rights to landing slots will bring it to an end." It continues: "At a time of climate emergency we need to drastically reduce our fossil fuel use, and in the context of our steadily dwindling carbon budget, it beggars belief that planes fly empty." Earlier this month, Lufthansa revealed it had operated 18,000 flights this winter that would otherwise have been cancelled due to lack of passengers, including 3,000 on Brussels Airlines, which it owns. That prompted Belgium's federal mobility minister to raise the issue with the European commissioner for transport. In a letter, the Belgian official described the current rules as "economic, ecologic and socially nonsense." Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Fri, Jan 21, 2022
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image A man inspects the wreckage of a building after it was damaged in Saudi-led coalition airstrikes, in Sanaa, Yemen, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. Hani Mohammed/AP Hani Mohammed/AP DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Yemen lost its connection to the internet nationwide early Friday after Saudi-led airstrikes targeted a site in the contested city of Hodeida, an advocacy group said, plunging the war-torn nation offline.NetBlocks said the disruption began around 1 a.m. local and affected TeleYemen, the state-owned monopoly that controls internet access in the country. TeleYemen is now run by the Houthi rebels who have held Yemen's capital, Sanaa, since late 2014.Yemen was "in the midst of a nation-scale internet blackout following airstrike on (a) telecom building," NetBlocks said, without immediately elaborating. The San Diego-based Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis and San Francisco-based internet firm CloudFlare also noted a nationwide outage affecting Yemen beginning around the same time.The Houthi's Al-Masirah satellite news channel said the strike on the telecommunications building had killed and wounded people. It released chaotic footage of people digging through rubble for a body as gunshots could be heard. Aid workers assisted bloodied survivors. The Saudi-led coalition battling the Houthi rebels acknowledged carrying out "accurate airstrikes to destroy the capabilities of the militia" around Hodeida's port. It did not immediately acknowledge striking a telecommunication target as NetBlocks described, but instead called Hodeida a hub for piracy and Iranian arms smuggling to back the Houthis. The undersea FALCON cable carries internet into Yemen through the Hodeida port along the Red Sea for TeleYemen. The FALCON cable has another landing in Yemen's far eastern port of Ghaydah as well, but the majority of Yemen's population lives in its west along the Red Sea. A cut to the FALCON cable in 2020 caused by a ship's anchor also caused widespread internet outages in Yemen. Land cables to Saudi Arabia have been cut since the start of Yemen's civil war, while connections to two other undersea cables have yet to be made amid the conflict, TeleYemen previously said.A Saudi-led coalition entered Yemen's war in 2015 to back its ousted government. The war has turned into the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with international criticism of Saudi airstrikes killing civilians and targeting the country's infrastructure. The Houthis meanwhile have used child soldiers and indiscriminately laid landmines across the country. The war reached into the United Arab Emirates, a Saudi ally, on Monday when the Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack on Abu Dhabi, killing three and wounding six. ___Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellAP. Adblock test (Why?) [...]
Fri, Jan 21, 2022
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS