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Enlarge this image With the pandemic, many people are turning to at-home workouts and walks in their neighborhoods. That's good, says Exercised author Daniel Lieberman. "You don't have to do incredible strength training ... to get some benefits of physical activity." Grace Cary/Getty Images Grace Cary/Getty Images For much of history, human beings needed to be physically active every day in order to hunt or gather food — or to avoid becoming food themselves. It was an active lifestyle, but one thing it didn't include was any kind of formal exercise. Daniel Lieberman is a professor in the department of human evolutionary biology at Harvard. He says that the notion of "getting exercise" — movement just for movement's sake — is a relatively new phenomenon in human history. "Until recently, when energy was limited and people were physically active, doing physical activity that wasn't necessarily rewarding, just didn't happen," Lieberman says. "When I go to these [remote African tribal] villages, I'm the only person who gets up in the morning and goes for a run. And often they laugh at me. They think I'm just absolutely bizarre. ... Why would anybody do something like that?" Lieberman has spent a lot of time with indigenous hunter gatherers in Africa and Latin America, cataloging how much time they spend walking, running, lifting, carrying and sitting. He writes about his findings, as well as the importance of exercise and the myths surrounding it in his new book, Exercised. "If you actually look at what our ancestors do, they walk about five miles a day, which turns out to be, for most people, about 10,000 steps," Lieberman says. Lieberman notes that many people are moving less than they did before the pandemic. He says if 10,000 steps feels out of reach, it's OK to shoot for less — just so long as you're focused on movement. Even fidgeting can keep your muscles engaged. "The more we study physical activity, the more we realize that it doesn't really matter what you do," Lieberman says. "You don't have to do incredible strength training ... to get some benefits of physical activity. There's all different kinds of physical activity, and it's all good in different ways." Enlarge this image Pantheon Interview highlights On the demonizing of sitting as "the new smoking" When I walk into a village in a remote part of the world where people don't have chairs or a hunter-gatherer camp, people are always sitting. ... Some friends and colleagues of mine actually put some accelerometers on some hunter gatherers and found that they sit on average about 10 hours a day, which is pretty much the same amount of time Americans like me spend sitting. So it turns out that I think we've kind of demonized sitting a little falsely. It's not unnatural or strange or weird to sit a lot, but it is problematic if, of course, that's all you do. As I started to explore the literature more, I was fascinated because most of the data that associates sitting a lot with poor health outcomes turns out to be leisure-time sitting. So if you look at how much time people spend sitting at work, it's not really that associated with heart disease or cancers or diabetes. But if you look at how much people sit when they're not at work, well, then the numbers get a little bit scary. On the importance of "interrupted sitting" Just getting up every once in a while, every 10 minutes or so just to go to the bathroom or pet your dog or make yourself a [...]
Thu, Jan 21, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Photo released by the City of London Police showing the first "cannabis factory" discovered in the City. City of London Police City of London Police Home to the London Stock Exchange, the Bank of England and scores of corporations, the financial district, known as the City, is normally teeming with activity. But the scenes, sounds and scents of the normally busy City have been restrained thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. Recently, people in the area noticed something else in the air. The smell of cannabis. Police say they found the first ever "cannabis factory" in the City of London last week. Officers destroyed 826 plants found in the basement of a non-residential property inside London's financial district. It was the strong smell of cannabis that led officials to the bust, which police called "significant." The growers likely took advantage of reduced footfall amid the pandemic, police say, as the normally bustling area makes it less than ideal for a covert, illegal farm. Police cheekily headlined a press release about the incident "City of London Police weeds out crime." The City, London's historic center and financial hub, is also known as the Square Mile because it's only 1.12 square miles in area. Recreational cannabis is illegal to use, sell or grow in Britain and can result in up to 14 years in prison, fines or both. Police made two arrests in the case and say they continue to investigate. Let's block ads! (Why?) [...]
Thu, Jan 21, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS
Enlarge this image Katy Perry performs during the Celebrating America event on Wednesday, following the inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th president of the United States. Biden Inaugural Committee/AP Biden Inaugural Committee/AP A maskless President Biden addressed the nation Wednesday night standing at the feet of Abraham Lincoln Memorial during a televised and star-studded celebration of the historic inauguration. "We're good people," he reassured viewers, before picking up the theme of his earlier speech on the steps of the Capitol. "Unity forces us to come together in common love that defines us as Americans," Biden said. President Joe Biden addresses the nation during Celebrating America YouTube The 46th president urged the public to come together, saying it's "the only way we'll get through the darkness around us." He noted that the obstacles facing the nation, including the pandemic currently ravaging communities across the country, racial injustices, the climate crisis are "threats to our very democracy." "Will we meet the moment like our forbearers have?" Biden asked. "I believe we must and I believe we will," he said. "You, the American people are the reason why I have never been more optimistic about America than I am this very day." He added: "America is built of decency and dignity of love and healing of greatness and goodness. Of possibility." The inaugural program, called Celebrating America, featured several tributes to the extraordinary efforts by nurses, doctors, teachers and other frontline workers who have stepped up throughout the coronavirus pandemic. In her first remarks to the nation as vice president, Harris echoed the president's call to unite in the days ahead. "In many ways this moment embodies our character as nation," she said in a brief address to the audience. "Even in dark times, we not only dream, we do. We shoot for the moon and then we plant our flag on it," Harris said. "We are bold, we are fearless and ambitious. We are undaunted in our believe that we shall overcome that we will rise up." She added: "A great experiment takes great determination. The will to do the work and then the wisdom to keep refining, keep tinkering, keep perfecting." Although much of the program hit several somber notes, the two-hour show was interspersed with several performances by a variety of singers, musicians, artists, and actors. Among them John Legend sang Nina Simone's Feeling Good. John Legend performs at Celebrating America YouTube Justin Timberlake and Ant Clemons performed Better Days. Justin Timberlake & Ant Clemons performing at Celebrating America [...]
Thu, Jan 21, 2021
Source: Headlines -NPR Category: TOP NEWS