Archive For The “Music” Category

Elise LeGrow's 'Playing Chess' Honors Blues And R&B Greats

By |

Elise LeGrow's 'Playing Chess' Honors Blues And R&B Greats

Elise LeGrow remakes blues and soul classics for her full-length debut, Playing Chess.

Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

hide caption

toggle caption

Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Chess Records is an American institution. Founded in Chicago by Phil and Leonard Chess in the 1950s, it became the label that launched Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley. Now, Canadian singer Elise LeGrow is taking on the label’s catalog on her debut album: Playing Chess features covers of songs made famous by Chuck Berry, Etta James, Sugar Pie DeSanto, The Moonglows and more.

“Etta James has been one of my favorite singers for a very long time and, of course, I was aware of Chuck Berry’s hits. But I didn’t realize that the common thread there was Chess,” LeGrow tells NPR’s Scott Simon.

[embedded content]
YouTube

The album features guest appearances from the Dap-Kings and, on the track “Long, Lonely Nights,” Questlove and Captain Kirk Douglas from The Roots. Questlove’s father, Lee Andrews, co-wrote that ballad back in 1965.

As she put together the track list, LeGrow says, old memories collided with some new surprises. Now 30, she’d heard Chuck Berry’s “You Never Can Tell” for the first time as a child, playing behind Uma Thurman and John Travolta in Pulp Fiction‘s iconic dance sequence. When she put the song on her covers shortlist, her producer revealed he had written an original melody for the lyrics 40 years ago. Their combined efforts resulted in something all LeGrow’s own: “I’ve had some people say it’s completely unrecognizable until they hear the line, ‘C’est la vie,’ ” she says.

LeGrow is already looking ahead to her next release, but she says she’ll still want her sound to stay in the tradition of the greats she emulates on Playing Chess: “a live band and a girl in a room.”

Playing Chess is available now from S-Curve Records. Listen to the full interview at the audio link.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

A Town In Mexico Sees Guitar Sales Soar Thanks To The Movie 'Coco'

By |

A Town In Mexico Sees Guitar Sales Soar Thanks To The Movie 'Coco'

A scene from the Disney-Pixar animated movie Coco, about a young boy, Miguel, who dreams of becoming a musician despite his parents’ objections.

Disney/Pixar

hide caption

toggle caption

Disney/Pixar

Fresh off its Golden Globe award for best animation, the Disney-Pixar movie Coco is a favorite to win an Oscar next month.

It’s a sweet story of a small boy, Miguel, who dreams of becoming a musician despite his parents’ objections. On the way, he finds family, tradition and a magnificent white guitar, encrusted with pearl details and a black skull.

Real-life sales of guitars like Miguel’s guitar have soared thanks to the movie. And not just in U.S. stores. A small town in Mexico’s western highlands, famous for its generation of guitar makers, is also enjoying a Coco boon.

Paracho, in the state of Michoacán, is the former home of the very guitar maker who helped design the instrument seen in the film.

The town of Paracho, in the western Mexican state of Michoacán, has a long history of guitar making dating back to the 18th century. The guitar featured in Coco was designed by a former resident of Paracho. Guitar makers in the town have been enjoying a sales boon ever since the movie debuted late last year.

Carrie Kahn/NPR

hide caption

toggle caption

Carrie Kahn/NPR

Now living in Los Angeles, 65-year-old German Vazquez worked with Pixar on Miguel’s guitar. Although, he left Paracho back in the 1970s, this small town hasn’t forgotten him.

Coco is a hit in the United States, and has raked in more than $700 million in box offices worldwide. But particularly in Mexico, it became the highest-grossing movie of all time. The town of Paracho is gaining some fame along with it.

“It’s impressive, everyone’s gone loco for Coco,” says souvenir shopkeeper Claudia Rodríguez de Velásquez. “We have a long list of back orders,” she says, running her fingers over a dozen Post-it notes attached to a wall by the cash register.

Ever since Coco debuted late last year, she can’t keep the famous white guitars on her shelves.

Guitars, especially white-painted ones, in the Mexican town of Paracho are selling fast thanks to Coco. “We are all loco for Coco,” one shopkeeper says.

Carrie Kahn/NPR

hide caption

toggle caption

Carrie Kahn/NPR

Her family’s guitar factory down the road is churning out 1,500 instruments a week, she says. Before Coco, Rodríguez says 90 percent of their exported guitars were tan colored, with just a few painted white. Now it’s totally the opposite: white Coco-like guitars dominate the orders.

There’s been a run on other kinds of instruments made in Paracho too.

César Ivan Lemus sits in his dusty workshop above his house, shaving flat the wooden neck of a large guitarrón favored by mariachi bands. He says he’s filling orders as fast as he can, selling mainly to mariachi schools and stores in Texas and California.

César Ivan Lemus, a third-generation Paracho artisan, shaves the neck of a guitarrón he’s making. Lemus sells all types of instruments to mariachi schools and stores in the U.S. He says he’s working as fast as he can to keep up with orders these days.

Carrie Kahn/NPR

hide caption

toggle caption

Carrie Kahn/NPR

“We are so proud that Pixar turned to a Mexican artisan to design Coco‘s guitar,” he says. “And not just any Mexican — a former Paracho resident,” he adds beaming.

This weekend Paracho is paying homage to Vazquez and the movie. Residents decorated several streets to look like the village in Coco — set in a fictional part of Mexico — and they covered a large bronze guitar statue at the town’s entrance all in white.

Jesús Ocampo, who works for the local government, says it’s time one of Paracho’s gifted guitar makers got some overdue credit.

Workers cover a large bronze guitar statue in white. The statue sits at the entrance to the town of Paracho. This weekend, the town will pay tribute to German Vazquez, a former resident and master guitar maker from the town. Vazquez designed the white guitar featured in the movie Coco.

Carrie Kahn/NPR

hide caption

toggle caption

Carrie Kahn/NPR

“There are a lot of people here in Paracho who have made guitars for very famous musicians around the world but they are practically anonymous,” he says.

He claims that other brands attempt to sell Paracho guitars packaged with their own labels, without recognition.

Ocampo says there are no official statistics, but Paracho’s guitar makers are estimated to export as many as a million guitars a year. The town has been in the guitar making business for centuries.

Master guitar maker Arnulfo Rubio Orozco holds up his latest project. It’s taken him a month to craft this guitar with pearl accents and wood from southern Mexico.

Carrie Kahn/NPR

hide caption

toggle caption

Carrie Kahn/NPR

Arnulfo Rubio Orozco, a master artisan who says he’s a third cousin of the Coco guitar maker in California, comes from a line of guitar makers going back to his great grandfather. He tightens the strings on an instrument he’s been working on for a month. With pearl details and wood from southern Mexico, it will fetch about $2,000.

“My dad didn’t want me to make guitars,” says Rubio. Instead he was sent to work winters in a Christmas tree farm in North Carolina. “I had to sneak around, ducking into other guitar makers’ workshops to learn,” he says.

That’s almost like Miguel in the movie. He hid his dream of being a musician from his family.

“I guess the story repeats itself again,” Rubio chuckles.

But Rubio hasn’t actually seen Coco. Paracho is a small town, it doesn’t have a movie theater.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Drake Sprinkles Good Deeds Across Miami In Video For 'God's Plan'

By |

Drake Sprinkles Good Deeds Across Miami In Video For 'God's Plan'
[embedded content]
YouTube

Drake might as well run for mayor of Miami. His new video for chart-topper “God’s Plan” is a nearly six-minute showcase of ad-hoc philanthropy throughout the city. Before the Director X’s and Karena Evans’ visual even gets going, it gives some context to what fans are about to see: “The budget for the video was $996,631.90,” the opening title cards read. “We gave it all away. Don’t tell the label…”

From there, it’s straight to the heart of the city: interview snippets with Miami-Dade’s colorful characters, the pandemonium of the students at Miami Senior High School and the University of Miami. The clip maximizes the heartwarming and triumphant energy — a rundown of its angel moments:

  • Giving away stacks of cash to people on the street
  • Presenting a scholarship check to a student at University of Miami
  • Shutting down Brickell City Centre mall to allow the women of Lotus House Shelter some shopping sprees
  • Carts of wrapped toys for the children of Lotus House
  • Paying for shopper’s groceries at a neighborhood supermarket
  • Surprising a family with a brand new car
  • Donating to City of Miami’s Fire Department, Frost School of Music and Univserity of Miami

Drizzy fans knew The Boy was up to something earlier this month when people documented his music video being shot on their campus and posted previews to social media. The track itself has been setting records in 2018, too: “God’s Plan” was released on Dec. 19 as a part of the rapper’s latest EP Scary Hours and subsequently shot to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 within a week and has sat atop the Hot 100 for three weeks straight.

Just before dropping the visual, Drake wrote on Instagram the video is: “The most important thing I have ever done in my career.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

KT Tunstall On Mountain Stage

By |

KT Tunstall On Mountain Stage

Hailing from St. Andrews, Scotland, singer, songwriter, guitarist and loop-expert KT Tunstall didn’t come from a musical family, which is a rarity for Mountain Stage performers. Her family supported her, though, and Tunstall’s 2004 album Eye To The Telescope would produce major pop hits “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree” and “Suddenly I See.” Both are included in this live set from Athens, Ohio, recorded on campus of Ohio University. The album went multiplatinum and was followed by three more releases.

Standing solo on stage, Tunstall builds her signature hit “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree” piece by piece, layering vocals, tambourine and her acoustic guitar — culminating with a chorus of kazoos.

After a four-year hiatus, brought on by feeling burned out and a desire for more space, Tunstall returned to touring in 2016.

That year, she released a new album, KIN, which she says was largely inspired by driving through the canyon roads of California, where a few of her artistic inspirations had written their own works. Listen as Tunstall pulls the audience in using easy chorus lines and charismatic beats, all while sharing her journey back into songwriting.

Tunstall has collaborated with and opened shows for Glasgow pop icons Simple Minds on their acoustic tour. A new run of shows in the U.K. with Simple Minds and The Pretenders has been scheduled for 2018.

SET LIST

  • “Black Horse And The Cherry Tree”
  • “It Took Me So Long To Get Here, But Here I Am”
  • “Hold On”
  • “Feel It All”
  • “Suddenly I See”

Photo Credit: Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Frank Ocean Gifts Fans With 'Moon River' Cover On Valentine's Night

By |

Frank Ocean Gifts Fans With 'Moon River' Cover On Valentine's Night

Frank Ocean performs at Panorama Music Festival in July 2017.

Angela Weiss/Getty Images

hide caption

toggle caption

Angela Weiss/Getty Images

While some of us were shelling out cash for flowers and chocolates, Frank Ocean gifted his listeners with new music in honor of Valentine’s Day. The illusive R&B star released a cover of “Moon River” in the wee hours on his YouTube and Tumblr accounts. The 1961 original, by Henry Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer, was written for Audrey Hepburn to sing in the cult classic Breakfast at Tiffany’s and has been covered over the years by Jerry Butler, Aretha Franklin, Frank Sinatra and more.

[embedded content]
YouTube

For his version, Ocean starts by distorting his voice to resemble an innocent child (a similar tactic he frequently employed on his last album Blonde) and croons over an achingly slow and beautiful bass line, providing his own supporting vocals and harmonies throughout. It’s far from the first time Ocean has put his own synthy spin on a pop classic; check out his covers of Stevie Wonder’s “Close To You” and The Isley Brothers’ “At Your Best (You Are Love)” for more nostalgia.

With a steady stream of releases in 2017 and now this new cover surfacing, it’s apparent the 30-year-old has every intention of making good on his promise that fans will “love 2018.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Gina Chavez Shares Intimate Love Letter For Valentine's Day

By |

Gina Chavez Shares Intimate Love Letter For Valentine's Day

Gina Chavez

Spencer Selvidge/Courtesy of the artist

hide caption

toggle caption

Spencer Selvidge/Courtesy of the artist

Austin-based singer/songwriter Gina Chavez has always worn her emotions on her sleeve.

Her deeply felt ruminations on things like identity, love, life, fun and joy have made her music an Alt.Latino favorite for quite a few years now. Chavez’s voice is perfectly suited to reflect all of those experiences and to take us to places where we dare to let our emotional guards down.

So it comes as no surprise to me that I would completely fall under the spell of a new Gina Chavez single from her upcoming EP, Lightbeam. “Heaven Knows” is a sensual groove-poem set to lyrics that address life’s most passionate moments.

Heaven knows

You’re just my type

From your freckles to you baby toes

You taste just right

Gina Chavez has so far made music that draws from the myriad Latin music styles she has explored on her albums and with her tight-knit live band. But this track, and the upcoming album, is steeped in the slow-burn soul and uptempo R&B that, along with Latin music, was the soundtrack of her youth. In fact, the new record offers up a different side of Chavez and may catch some of her diehard fans by surprise.

Chavez makes no secret of the fact that her motivation for these new love songs is her recent marriage to her long time partner, Jodi Granado.

“I took some time to allow myself to write,” Chavez said. “No boundaries, no genres, just me and my guitar, and I was pretty surprised when these soul-tinged songs bubbled up. But this is the story my heart wanted to tell; the story what it means to be a Catholic Latina and fall in love with a woman; the story of what it means to live your heart no matter what the world says.”

Lightbeam will be released later this summer, and “Heaven Knows” is the first of a-once-a-month single release plan to slowly unveil her new direction.

Ultimately, Gina Chavez’s musical gift is her ability to tap into our own emotions with songs that often feel as if they are about us. “Heaven Knows” and the upcoming EP Lightbeam is another artistic step forward for an artist who is happy in life and with her music.

[embedded content]

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Songs We Love: Fanny Walked The Earth, 'Lured Away'

By |

Songs We Love: Fanny Walked The Earth, 'Lured Away'

“All those years of life experience, time on our instruments, having shared our history together and apart, led to the stories written about on this record,” says Brie Howard.

Marita Madeloni /Courtesy of the artist

hide caption

toggle caption

Marita Madeloni /Courtesy of the artist

Fanny is one of music’s lost legendary entities, often invoked but seldom playlisted. The band, a vital part of the Los Angeles rock scene in the early 1970s, was the first all-woman ensemble to release albums on a major label. Sisters June and Jean Millington formed the core of the group, with June on adventurous electric guitar and Jean on the Beatles-esque bass. Formed from the velvet ashes of the sisters’ teenage touring band the Svelts, Fanny was a showcase for the swagger of long-haired, bell-bottomed, fierce femmes at the dawn of the women’s liberation movement.

With June tossing off solos with improvisational grace, keyboardist Nickey Barclay adding audacious class on keyboards and Jean’s funky basslines leading the way to the dance floor, Fanny was as passionate as Laura Nyro and as cool as Little Feat. Yet maybe because the band never did have a big hit single, its story is now better known than its music. Now, the Millington sisters, along with original Svelts and once-and-future Fanny drummer and vocalist Brie Howard (Alice de Buhr was also a Fanny member), are out to correct that with a reunion — and a whole new album of original music — as Fanny Walked The Earth.

[embedded content]
YouTube

Jean and June Millington have continued to play music together over the years while also forging separate paths. June also co-founded the Institute for Musical Arts in Western Massachusetts, a recording and retreat complex supporting women musicians at all stages of their careers. Brie Howard’s life beyond music has included motherhood, an impressive career in film, many songwriting credits and a custom cake business. She has been in two bands since leaving Fanny, American Girls and, with her husband David Darling, Boxing Gandhis. (See her rocking some killer percussion in this video.) Howard answered the Millington sisters’ call to reunite in early 2016, and things just felt right.

“The minute we finished the first song during rehearsal, we all knew we sounded pretty f****** great!” Howard says in a recent email exchange.

A short video Howard posted to Facebook garnered the attention of Blue Élan Records president Kirk Pasich. “He had all the Fanny albums in his record collection,” Howard says. “The deal was offered.”

Fanny Walked The Earth

Courtesy of the artist

The songs on Fanny Walked The Earth, to be released March 2, came from fruitful jams among the three women. “They weren’t written with a particular approach in mind,” says Howard. “It had been 50 years since we first played together. All those years of life experience, time on our instruments, having shared our history together and apart, led to the stories written about on this record. There’s a huge difference in what there is to write about now than when we were in our teens and early 20’s.”

Though on a major label, Reprise, the original Fanny operated in ways that prepared the Millingtons and Howard for today’s free-for-all music business environment. The Svelts, in fact, were one of the only all-female garage rock bands on the West Coast, rogue warriors holding their own in a sometimes rough club scene.

“Being in a band in the ’60s taught me self-sufficiency,” Howard explains. “We were our own roadies, sound crew, manager, booking agent, funders, transportation, publicity! I drew and painted our posters in 1966 and designed and created our album artwork.”

Howard wrote half of the band’s new album and helped direct the video for “Lured Away,” the band’s first song in 44 years. “I still have a ‘get it done yourself’ attitude about many things. We’re busy on social media, fully immersed on as many levels as we can be.”

Fanny Walked The Earth conveys the same effervescent spirit the 1970s Fanny possessed; these women see no need to sit on stools and wax gentle about their position as rock ‘n’ roll elders. Having influenced bands from The Runaways to The Bangles, Fanny is ready to be heard by listeners ready to rediscover its uniquely welcoming jams.

Howard says the trio is eager to tour; the new songs were designed to be experienced live. “On the new record,” she says, “you can expect to hear three very fortunate women who have earned the opportunity to continue kicking ass!”


Fanny Walked The Earth comes out March 2 via Blue Élan Records.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Tom Rapp, '60s Folk Experimentalist And Civil Rights Attorney, Dead At 70

By |

Tom Rapp, '60s Folk Experimentalist And Civil Rights Attorney, Dead At 70

Tom Rapp photographed in 1998 at the Haddonfield train station in Philadelphia.

The Washington Post/Washington Post/Getty Images

hide caption

toggle caption

The Washington Post/Washington Post/Getty Images

Tom Rapp, a civil rights attorney and musician best known for his late-’60s and early-’70s recordings under the name Pearls Before Swine, has died while in hospice care at his home in Melbourne, Fla., his publicist confirmed to NPR Music. He was 70 years old.

Like many of his generation, Rapp was inspired Elvis and The Everly Brothers. But it was hearing Bob Dylan‘s “Blowin’ in the Wind” in the early ’60s that finally galvanized him to begin writing music in earnest. (A possibly apocryphal tale goes that Rapp and Dylan actually competed as children in the same talent contest, with Dylan placing fifth, Rapp second.)

Cover art for Pearls Before Swine’s album One Nation Underground, a detail from Hieronymous Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights.

Courtesy of the artist

hide caption

toggle caption

Courtesy of the artist

Pearls Before Swine’s first record, One Nation Underground, released in 1967, wore that influence plainly on its sleeve — not so much the fraught Hieronymous Bosch extract that adorned its cover, but in the Xeroxing of Dylan’s vocal delivery (with the addition of Rapp’s notable and endearing speech impediment) heard on the song “Playmate.” While Rapp may have been emulating on the mic there, the rest of the music on “Playmate” is woven with forward-thinking threads of psychedelia and garage rock. Further on, Rapp steps into his own, even presaging punk’s approach to institutional fealty (don’t) in the lyrics of “Drop Out!” and a avant-garde approach to cursing word, spelled out in Morse code, on “(Oh Dear) Miss Morse.”

The album would go on to sell “about 250,000,” Rapp told NPR Music’s Bob Boilen last fall during a conversation centered on its 50th anniversary reissue. Despite the impressive sales, Rapp and his bandmates received next to no money from them. Bernard Stollman, who ran the label ESP-Disk’ that released One Nation Underground and its follow-up, told them that “the CIA and the Mafia were putting [the records] out themselves,” and so the sales weren’t ending with money in the pocket of ESP-Disk’ and, by extension, Pearls Before Swine. (Or many of the label’s other artists, the story goes.)

Rapp would go on to release eight more well-regarded records — Balaclava, the follow-up to One Nation Underground, perhaps highest among them — before utterly disappearing from music in 1974, not long after opening a concert for Patti Smith.

Infused with the spirit of the counterculture, but not willing to take his own advice and “drop out,” Rapp headed to college and, from there, law school, graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1984. Rapp was a civil rights attorney in Philadelphia until 2001, after which he returned again to Florida. His practice emphasized reining in corporations and local governments.

As much as his music, Rapp’s work as a lawyer and his attitude towards his rediscovery in the popular imagination were illustrative of his spirit. Nearly 17 years ago, Rapp’s career was profiled for Weekend Editionby Peter Clowney. Rapp was bemused at the bloom of his late-in-life celebrity, treating it with a humbled, arm’s-length detachment, the attitude of someone who had long since filled his life.

Describing that rediscovery, which began around 1992 while he was in Philadelphia, Rapp said: “They call me a psychedelic godfather and they have these articles about how I’m a legend. The way that works is, you do some albums in the ’60s that are OK, you go away for 30 years, and you don’t die — then you’re a legend.”

During that piece, Rapp shared his “lessons from the ’60s.” They began with a dark half-joke: “One of the lessons of the ’60s was that assassination works.” He continued: “Love is real. Justice is real. Countries have no morals; you have to kick them to get them to do the right thing. Honesty is possible and necessary. And everything is not for sale.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

Tom Misch Floats Under A Frozen Lake In 'Water Baby' Video

By |

Tom Misch Floats Under A Frozen Lake In 'Water Baby' Video
[embedded content]

Tom Misch is a U.K.-based beatmaker well known among fans for his prowess behind the boards. But in 2018, the 22-year-old stalwart doing his best to show off the many facets of his artistry. That includes pushing his sound, booking U.S. tour dates and releasing an adventurous music video in which he does his own aquatic stunts.

For “Water Baby,” Misch, rapper Loyle Carner and a few double-jointed dancers show off the beauty and hostility of nature in the wintry wild. At one point in the Georgia Hudson-directed clip, Misch floats just under the ice sheets of a frozen lake. The image is concerning, but beautiful; there is a serenity in Misch’s body language as he sings.

“I’m a keen swimmer and love surfing, so that kind of inspired the song,” Misch tells NPR. “Me and Loyle chatted about ideas for the video and he mentioned he had been talking to Georgia, who had directed some of his previous videos, about a concept they had in mind involving a lake and a dancer. The three of us got on a call to talk through the idea and it all came together. It was a tough one to shoot, but was all worthwhile.”

The song structure of “Water Baby,” though unorthodox, flows effortlessly as well. The first verse on the track goes to Carner, a frequent collaborator of Misch’s, who delivers a poignant 18 bars about being his family’s backbone. Then, against jazzy, horn-heavy production, the vocalist and producer sings of swimming through all-too-relatable struggles: from loneliness and coffee scalds to missed chances and missed Ubers.

“Water Baby” follows up Misch’s late 2017 single “Movie.” Both tracks will appear on the artist’s forthcoming debut album Geography, which he plans to release just in time for warmer temps and his Coachella debut.


Geography comes out April 6 via Beyond The Groove.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

London's Contemporary Jazz Scene Shines On 'We Out Here'

By |

London's Contemporary Jazz Scene Shines On 'We Out Here'

We Out Here pulls together the cream of the crop from London’s contemporary jazz world.

Brownswood Recordings/Courtesy of the artist

hide caption

toggle caption

Brownswood Recordings/Courtesy of the artist

The U.K.’s jazz scene is flourishing these days thanks, in part, to the young artists pumping it with new life. We Out Here, the latest compilation project from DJ and producer Gilles Peterson‘s indie label Brownswood Recordings, is a fitting proclamation of ownership from the contemporaries who are adding color to the landscape.

The project’s nine tracks were recorded in August 2017 over a three day period. Smooth and concise, this compilation is spearheaded by saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings, who is credited as musical director, and features sounds from Hutchings, Maisha, Ezra Collective, Moses Boyd, Theon Cross, Nubya Garcia, and more. Each song has a story of its own, but they all manage to flow together as if one surmounting jam session. “Pure Shade” by Ezra Collective seems to finds its foundation in Afrobeat, and there are accents of bossa nova in “Abusey Junction” by Kokoroko. Shabaka Hutchings’ “Black Skin, Black Mask” rides a rhythm defined only by an untamable clarinet.

We Out Here is a window into a world of London’s ripe jazz renaissance, one that will only spread to new shores as the year goes on.

We Out Here by We Out Here

We Out Here is available now via Brownswood Recordings.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read more »

AdSense
Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor