Archive For The “Music” Category

Marty Roberts of Los Angeles lounge duo Marty & Elayne is dead at 89

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Marty Roberts of Los Angeles lounge duo Marty & Elayne is dead at 89

After performing six nights a week for nearly four decades, Los Angeles musician Marty Roberts has died. He was half of the husband-and-wife duo Marty & Elayne.


AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts, one half of the married lounge act Marty & Elayne, died last week at 89.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For decades, the duo performed five or six nights a week, Marty on drums and vocals, Elayne on piano and flute.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, “SWINGERS”)

MARTY AND ELAYNE: (Singing) You can tell by the way I use my walk I’m a woman’s man – no time to talk.

KELLY: They were fixtures at the Los Angeles bar and restaurant the Dresden Room, where they played an eclectic mix of jazz standards, original numbers and their own twists on pop hits.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, “SWINGERS”)

MARTY AND ELAYNE: (Singing) Staying alive – ah, ah, ah, ah, staying alive.

CHANG: That rendition of “Stayin’ Alive,” a cameo in the 1996 movie “Swingers,” shot them into pop culture stardom. Their daughter, Hali Gillin, says the duo often drew standing-room-only crowds.

HALI GILLIN: They have fans in probably every country. And they would come to America, and that would be one of the stops that they needed to make.

CHANG: And though they may have come for the music, the fans would get plenty of personality, too.

GILLIN: If you were rude and talked a lot while my mom was playing certain songs, she would turn up the synthesizer and teach you that’s not polite (laughter). And my dad – if you talked too much, he would literally get on the mic and say, hey; you don’t have a speaking part in this.

KELLY: Gillin says that frankness was on full display when her mother first met Roberts back in 1970.

GILLIN: My dad – he was a hairdresser before. And so he looked at my mom and basically said, like, I need to trim your hair. Like, you got some split ends (laughter). My mom was like, how rude. But eventually they got past it. And my mom said she knew right when she met him that she was going to marry him.

KELLY: And she did. They married just four months later.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “COME FLY WITH ME”)

MARTY AND ELAYNE: (Singing) Come on and fly with me. Let’s fly. Let’s fly away.

CHANG: Through the decades, the pair has had their share of famous fans. When Frank Sinatra showed up to see them play, Roberts serenaded Sinatra with one of the legend’s own tunes.

KELLY: Marty & Elayne continued to record together until just about a month ago. Marty Roberts died of cancer last Thursday. He was 89 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “COME FLY WITH ME”)

MARTY AND ELAYNE: (Singing) Come fly with me. Let’s fly. Let’s fly away. (Scatting).

Copyright © 2022 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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Chris Pierce on Mountain Stage

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Chris Pierce on Mountain Stage
Chris Pierce on Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Blessed with a soaring, church-built vocal range that’s often compared to Ray Charles, Chris Pierce has been all over the scene for the past 15 years. Discovered by Seal while attending USC, the indie, folk and blues singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has kept the rubber hot, touring 150 days a year while sharing the stage with such artists as Jill Scott, Al Green, Robert Cray, and Toots and the Maytals.

Making his first Mountain Stage appearance, recorded at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, S.C., Pierce shared power-packed songs from a new, critically acclaimed album titled American Silence.

Accompanied by acoustic guitar and vocals, Pierce carved the words of that album’s title track into the bones, singing of the American posture – complacency – in addressing and dealing with race issues: “Can we sing a song for you? / Will music move your heart and mind? / Will our song arrest you? / American silence is a crime.”

Concluding the tune on a fierce note, Pierce tells the crowd the origin story of the next: “I started to get a lot of calls from family and friends, and I come from a very diverse family … they all wanted to hear about what it felt like to be a Black man in America. I wanted the chorus to be a summary about racism, ‘Shame it, face it, damn it all to hell.’ This is ‘Sound All The Bells.’ “

Pierce closes the set with “Young Black and Beautiful,” a song of hope and resilience he wrote as a love letter to young Black kids everywhere – and to his former self, a 15-year-old who went deaf before eventually regaining most of the hearing in his right ear.

“Keep walking on against the wind / When you fall down get up again / You may be pushed, shoved and tossed / Know in your heart it is their loss.”

Set list:

  • “American Silence”
  • “Sound All the Bells”
  • “Chain Gang Fourth of July”
  • “It’s Been Burning For A While”
  • “Young, Black And Beautiful”

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Brazilian samba singer Elza Soares dies at 91

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Brazilian samba singer Elza Soares dies at 91

Brazilian singer Elza Soares performs at the Rock in Rio music festival in Rio de Janeiro in 2019. Soares died on Thursday.

Leo Correa/AP

Leo Correa/AP

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazilian samba singer Elza Soares died in her Rio de Janeiro home on Thursday afternoon, family members said on the artist’s official Instagram account. She was 91.

The singer “moved the world with her voice, her strength and her determination,” they said, adding she “will forever be in the history of music and in our hearts and the thousands of fans around the world.”

The family said Soares died of ”natural causes” and did not provide further detail.

Soares in 1970 in Rome.

Gianni Foggia/AP

Gianni Foggia/AP

Elza Gomes da Conceição was born in June 1930, in a modest Rio de Janeiro household. She became famous singing samba in the early 1960s, before diversifying to other genres, winning her the title of “singer of the millennium” in a BBC London competition in 1999.

Last month, she featured in a documentary series paying tribute to Black women singers who paved the way for other artists.

“Just like Elza Soares wanted, she sang until the end,” family members said in a statement Thursday.

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Sierra Ferrell seems to have always known where she was headed

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Sierra Ferrell seems to have always known where she was headed

  • “Jeremiah”
  • “Why’d Ya Do It?”
  • “In Dreams”

Sierra Ferrell is a what you might call a free spirit — someone who follows her dreams wherever they take her; like when she joined a troupe of wandering musicians in her 20s. On the other hand, Ferrell seems to have always known where she was going.

She started performing when she was just 7 years old. Now, she lives in the musical epicenter of Nashville, getting high praise for her vocal talent and songwriting skills — and if the title of her second album is any indication, that’s what she somehow knew she’d one day be doing. It’s called Long Time Coming.

In this session, Sierra Ferrell sits down to talk about her life and adventures so far, along with live recordings of her performances from last years XPoNential Music Festival.

Hear the session and her complete festival performance in the audio and video players above.

World Cafe: 1/20/22

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Tiny Desk Meets globalFEST: Kombilesa Mí, Northern Cree, Son Rompe Pera

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Tiny Desk Meets globalFEST: Kombilesa Mí, Northern Cree, Son Rompe Pera

YouTube

Premiering tonight at 8 p.m. ET.

For the second consecutive year, NPR teams up with globalFEST for a thrilling online music festival we call Tiny Desk Meets globalFEST: three nights, nine bands, and a world of musical traditions beamed into your living room.

Every January, I attend globalFEST at a New York City nightclub and see some of the most fantastic music I’ll experience all year. Not being able to do this live and in person again is a challenge, but it’s also an opportunity: Leaving the nightclub for the desktop lets us share this festival with the world. And … IT’S FREE!

For each of the three nights, Tiny Desk Meets globalFEST will present artists in intimate settings (often behind their own globe-topped tiny desks), some of whom are making their globalFEST debuts, while a few others are notable past performers.

It’s all hosted by African pop star and four-time Grammy Award winner Angélique Kidjo. She is one of the greatest artists in international music today, a creative force with 13 albums to her name. She also performed at the inaugural edition of globalFEST in 2004.

Tiny Desk has been working from home since March 2020, bringing you performances from across the country and the world. We’ve tried to maintain the same spirit as the shows at my NPR desk — stripped-down sets, an intimate setting — just in a different space. The following biographical information about each performer was written by the globalFEST team.


Kombilesa Mí

Born from the rich musical and historical heritage of San Basilio de Palenque, Colombia (the first free Black town in the Americas), Kombilesa Mí fuses the traditional sounds of the community with urban pop. The band’s members experiment with the instruments created by their ancestors (and introduced to them when they were young) by layering them between new sounds.

Over traditional percussion, metal handmade drums of their own design, and marímbula, Kombilesa Mí rhymes and raps in Spanish and the traditional Palenquero language, a fusion of African Bantu, Portuguese, French and English. During the performance, you’ll hear them call their music “RFP,” which means Rap Folklórico Palenquero, a combo of cumbia, son de negro, mapalé and son palenquero.

SET LIST

  • “I tando pa palenge”
  • “I a piyá bó”
  • “Kumo kusa tá”
  • “Los peinados”
  • “Asina gue”
  • “Ma Nduse”
  • “Ata uto begá”

Northern Cree

Northern Cree is a powwow and round dance act, based in Maskwacis, Alberta, Canada. Formed in 1982 by the Wood brothers – Steve, Randy, Charlie and Earl Wood of the Saddle Lake Cree Nation – most members originate from the Treaty 6 and are members of the Cree Nation. This year marks Northern Cree’s 40th birthday as a group.

Northern Cree has recorded 50 albums and been nominated for a GRAMMY nine times. They made history in 2017 when they became the first powwow group to perform at the Grammy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. They recorded this performance at the powwow arbor of the Tsuut’ina Nation.

SET LIST

  • “The Dream”
  • “Kohkominaw”
  • “Storytelling Warrior”

Son Rompe Pera

Born and raised in the deep outskirts of Mexico City, the three Gama brothers are keeping alive the rich legacy of marimba music running through their family. Originally performing alongside their father at local events as kids, they now find themselves at the forefront of the contemporary international cumbia scene with their sonic explorations of the classic marimba.

From the Salón Los Ángeles in Mexico City, this quintet urges listeners to their feet with their unique style of garage-marimba-cumbia rock, played on the historic marimba like no one has ever heard or seen before.

SET LIST

  • “La Tortuga del Arenal”
  • “Cumbia Pa’ Tu Madre”
  • “Proteus”
  • “Ay David!”
  • “Los Chucos Suaves”

Tiny Desk Meets globalFEST

TINY DESK TEAM

Producer: Bob Boilen

Video Producer: Maia Stern

Audio Mixing: Josh Rogosin

Tiny Production Team: Bobby Carter, Kara Frame, Joshua Bryant, Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

Executive Producer: Keith Jenkins

Senior VP, Programming: Anya Grundmann

GLOBALFEST ARTISTIC TEAM

Co-Directors: Shanta Thake, Isabel Soffer, Bill Bragin

2022 Curators: Shanta Thake, Isabel Soffer, Bill Bragin, Gabrielle Davenport

GLOBALFEST PRODUCTION TEAM

Event Producer: Ian Thake

Producer: THE OFFICE performing arts + film

Video Producer: Karim Tabbaa

SPECIAL THANKS

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

National Endowment for the ArtsNYC Department of Cultural Affairs

NYC Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment

JanArtsNYC.org

Social Media Manager: Valerie French

Publicity: Yuri Kwon, Pitch Perfect PR

Legal Services: Tamizdat

Legal Services: Duane Morris

THE OFFICE performing arts + film consists of Rachel Chanoff, Laurie Cearley, Olli Chanoff, Erica Zielinski, Nadine Goellner, Lynn Koek, Noah Bashevkin, Catherine DeGennaro, Gabrielle Davenport, Chloe Golding, Kyla Gardner, Tess Peppis, Zion Jackson, Scout Eisenberg and Jose Alvarado

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The Grammys have been rescheduled and moved to Las Vegas

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The Grammys have been rescheduled and moved to Las Vegas

Jon Batiste performs at the Austin City Limits Music Festival Oct. 10, 2021. The musician is nominated for 11 Grammy Awards.

Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP

Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP

The music industry’s biggest night was supposed to take place at the end of January, at the Crypto.com Arena in downtown Los Angeles. Then the omicron variant happened.

Now, the big award show is set to take place on April 3, and in a new venue too — the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

Representatives from the Recording Academy wouldn’t confirm the reasoning behind the location change, but it does look like the Crypto.com Arena’s calendar is full in the days leading up to April 3, not to mention both a Clippers and a Lakers game on the day of.

The move is not without its ripple effects, though, as it will be bumping the CMT Music Awards, which was scheduled for that same date.

The Grammys have been having a tough go of it recently. Last year’s ceremony tanked, with viewership dropping to 8.8 million. That’s a 53% drop from its 2020 numbers. The 2021 show was also the same ceremony that pop star The Weeknd vowed to boycott after being snubbed for any nominations, citing the anonymous committees that make up the initial ballots for voting as the main driver of his protests.

The Recording Academy has made some moves to increase equity to its roster of nominees — including doing away with those anonymous committees, as well as expanding the number of potential winners in the big categories.

Comedian and The Daily Show host Trevor Noah is still set to host the evening, which will be broadcast live as well as streamed on Paramount+.

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Molly Nilsson, ‘Pompeii’

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Molly Nilsson, ‘Pompeii’


Dark Skies Association
YouTube

A glorious piece of goth hit streaming services over the weekend: Molly Nilsson, a reigning queen of DIY synth-pop, capped her excellent new album, Extreme, with this soaring slice of skeletal melancholia, addressing the endgame of everlasting love. The Pompeii couple immortalized in ash, killed while in each others’ arms after the AD 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius, serve as inspiration here, and Nilsson doesn’t shy away from the macabre implications. “I’d say I love you but I catch my breath,” she chants, “Cause whatever I love I always love to death.” All the while, an assortment of synthesizers and drum machines churn away, steadfastly growing louder and brighter until all that’s left is bittersweet beams of light.

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On ‘CAPRISONGS,’ FKA twigs vibrates at her highest frequency

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On ‘CAPRISONGS,’ FKA twigs vibrates at her highest frequency

Interdisciplinary artist-musician FKA twigs released ‘CAPRISONGS,’ her debut mixtape and first release with Atlantic Records, on Jan. 14, 2022.

Orograph/Courtesy of the artist

Orograph/Courtesy of the artist

Pluto scoffs at superficiality. The planet’s transit, the way that the planet’s movement activates and interacts with a person’s natal chart, demands for connection with core purpose. It is a chance to break through illusions and probe deep in search of inner truth: to evolve and be reborn without perfunctory airs.

Born Tahliah Debrett Barnett, singer-songwriter FKA twigs celebrated her 34th birthday yesterday. A Capricorn and member of the Pluto in Scorpio generation according to her chart, twigs experienced a powerful transit during the last Pluto retrograde, a time of significant reflection and potential, the timing of which coincided with the process of creating her transformative new release CAPRISONGS.

The British musician and interdisciplinary performing artist first entered the pop-industrial complex as a backup dancer in music videos, a career of appearances that led to the development of a character. Alluring and nymph-like in nature, twigs’ avatar sang songs of yearning — operatic elegies about giving and taking, how quests for power destroy relationships and interrupt intimacy. With a duo of EPs and her cult favorite debut album LP1, twigs made a name for herself on a meta image that toyed with the gaze of whoever looked upon her. Capitalizing on seduction’s wealth, she created an avatar that presented both herself and her music as an uncanny valley: “I come alive because you want me,” her foundational works seemed to whisper. “You want me because I make you feel alive.”

The first fracture in twigs’ constructed, guarded image came with 2019’s MAGDALENE, her second studio album. Made in the midst of physical and emotional upheaval, twigs found solace in the historically misinterpreted image of Mary Magdalene. A project of mirrors and introspection, twigs confronted the binary trap she laid out for herself. Over sparse instrumentals, twigs’ soprano became clear for the first time. Lost in translation, now neither whore nor virgin, she located a version of herself inside of a centuries-old story about the demands made of women. For all its visceral intimacy, MAGDALENE still centered a covert twigs, one reconstructed through a familiar story. It was a different reality for her to disappear into.

On her new album CAPRISONGS, twigs finally lifts the veil. Once an aloof video girl; baroque lounge crooner; sword master; pole dancer; and wushu artist, twigs chaotically layers her previous personas on top of one another to reveal Tahliah Barnett, messy but free. Ranging from eerie ballads to sweaty club bangers, each track speaks to the highest expressions of her Capricorn sun, Sagittarius moon and Pisces Venus. With CAPRISONGS, she throws her rulebook out the window and dives into the depths of her abundance. She finds herself embracing traditional hooks for the first time in her musical career and ambitiously shifts her sound to showcase pop’s experimental, avant-garde potential. Doubling as her debut mixtape and first major label release, CAPRISONGS asks: what does a space where twigs, recalibrated and vibrating at her highest frequency, sound like?

Aided by new collaborator artist-producer El Guincho, twigs tests the boundaries of genre. She plucks traditional elements of synth-pop, dancehall, grime, neo-soul and ambient, splices them, and arranges them in a matrix only she — and authorized guests — can enter. This is essential twigs, a level of production she’s been evolving toward her whole career. Even sampling a taste of Ariana Grande’s addictive “yuh”s throughout the mixtape, she flits between incredulous ’80s MC on “oh my love;” contemplative, punk-adjacent beat poet on “which way” featuring Dystopia; whining bad gyal on mixtape highlight “papi bones” alongside hip-hop grime master Shygirl; and earnest altar boy attempting guidance on “lightbeamers.”

YouTube

Wildly varied in sound, twigs’ desire to rediscover experimentation’s exhilaration weaves a compelling thread throughout CAPRISONGS. Describing the project as a “journey back to herself,” its deviations offer a glimpse into twigs’ up-and-down, nonlinear process behind fulfillment, both in self and in her art. “I wanna be more confident, I really do,” twigs shares softly with a friend in the opening interlude of “meta angel,” the mixtape’s initial recall of her signature sound. Surrounded by a choir of her vocals layered on top of one another, she trips over insecurities, the constant deluge of negativity that restrains her light.

Overloaded with anxiety, she lets it all out on the dance floor as the mixtape transitions into lead single “tears in the club.” Building from Arca’s reggaeton-inspired keys, the R&B-pop track highlights the mixtape’s purpose: catharsis through physicality. A failed love has embedded itself in her body – “I wanna get you out of my hips, my thighs, my hair, my eyes, tonight’s the night,” she declares in the bridge – and the only solution is twigs’ reflexive dancer impulse to process emotion through movement. To be connected with the flesh is to leave the mind behind, and twigs plans on hogging the dance floor all night long.

Throughout CAPRISONGS, twigs opts out of delivering devastating gut-punch lyrics, instead choosing to express herself as succinctly and simply as she can. In incomplete sentences, an unspoken desire bridges her disparate thoughts, and her soprano susses out the moment’s feelings and opens up to its potential. She alternatively murmurs in place of words, repeats herself as if meditating. Still a tension between twigs’ desire to be honest and lingering need to remain hidden arises; even though she’s channeled positive happiness to pen her most authentically autobiographical lyrics to date, an overwhelming amount of autotune and digital distortion muddy their raw honesty. As vocal manipulation has been integral to twigs’ music and avatar for years, it tracks that she’d be hesitant to give it up on a project so personal. Unfortunately the distortion sounds too robotic in some cases, specifically on “minds of men” and “pamplemousse,” as if Amazon’s Alexa downloaded poetry software and delivered the result on loop.

Despite the mixtape’s digital saturation, there’s an undeniable warmth to CAPRISONGS. Curated primarily through DMs and Facetimes, another process first for twigs’ discography, its primary strength lies in the narrative interludes and soundbites of friends, collaborators and loved ones. They call her out, bring her close and affirm her worth. “I love you … I wish you could see in you what I see in you, what everyone sees in you,” one friend says. “That’s the golden stuff right there, and these are your golden years, so have fun.”

The need for encouragement and vulnerability and sharing that need with listeners is an intimacy unlike what we’ve previously experienced of twigs’ emotional depth. As her most collaborative project to date, CAPRISONGS reveals growth in twigs’ production expertise. Surprising features from Daniel Caesar, Jorja Smith and The Weeknd are seamless as twigs creates space for their unique sounds inside her own. Bareface confessions continue with the Arca-assisted “thank you song,” as she opens the mixtape’s closer with plaintive honesty: “I wanted to die, I’m just being honest. No longer afraid to say it out loud.” The track is saturated with emotion as twigs expresses gratitude for the love of the people around her, admitting that their care saved her life. Delicate and unafraid, “thank you song” harnesses core facets of the twigs’ we know best and uses them to innovate her material.

Even with its otherworldly ambience, twigs comes down to earth on the community-oriented CAPRISONGS, her lyrics anchored in reality for the first time. She’s vulnerable in her trying, celebratory in her discovery, generous with what she shares. As the mixtape progresses, the more that love is poured into her, the more she’s able to share it with others, chiefly her listener. Triumphant and external, the mixtape is a milestone of significant personal and professional transformation. FKA twigs has liberated herself from the confines of her character.

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Review: ‘Caprisongs,’ the latest from FKA twigs

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Review: ‘Caprisongs,’ the latest from FKA twigs

Pop singer FKA Twigs released new music on Friday, a mixtape called Caprisongs.


MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Changing gears now – we’ve got some new music to help you start the week just right. Pop singer FKA twigs has just released her latest album. It’s a mixtape called “Caprisongs.”

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “RIDE THE DRAGON”)

FKA TWIGS: Hey. I made you a mixtape.

MARTIN: It’s her first album since 2019 and since her lawsuit against her ex-boyfriend, actor Shia LaBeouf, accusing him of sexual and emotional abuse, which he denies. The album is already getting rave reviews, so we called NPR Music’s LaTesha Harris to walk us through a few standout tracks.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “PAPI BONES”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) Let’s start it again. Boom, boom, take us when you can’t find the one. But everybody wants to send out for my love. Sticky, sweet, I’m going to be like a killer, a killer, a killer.

LATESHA HARRIS, BYLINE: So what stood out to me about “Papi Bones” – and this is partially my favorite track on the mixtape – is just how completely evolved her sound is. There’s elements of Afrobeat and dancehall here, and that comes from producer El Guincho. The blaring alarms, the steel drums – this is completely different from what we’ve come to expect from twigs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “PAPI BONES”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) Oh, you’re so damn fine. We bump and grind and twirl. The champagne bubble up. My champagne bubble girl. Oh, you’re so damn fine. We bump and grind and twirl. The champagne bubble up. My champagne bubble girl.

HARRIS: The different layers of instrumentation and the different sounds that she brings into the project are so much more maximalist than we’ve expected from her. And I feel like that sonic experimentation kind of reflects, you know, how she’s been able to discover new things about herself, new things about her art.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “TEARS IN THE CLUB”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) Tears in the club ’cause your love’s got me f***** up. Tears in the club.

HARRIS: So on “Tears In The Club,” which features The Weeknd, there’s a really interesting dynamic between twigs as a narrator and The Weeknd as an observer.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “TEARS IN THE CLUB”)

THE WEEKND: (Singing) There’s no, no escaping me. Let it out like therapy. There’s no, no escaping me. Around your girls, in the club, on the road, on the radio.

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) Tears in the club ’cause your love’s got me f***** up. Tears in the club. I’m going to drown in the beat now. Tears in the club ’cause your love’s got me f***** up. Tears in the club.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “THANK YOU SONG”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) I wanted to die. I’m just being honest. No longer afraid to say it out loud.

HARRIS: The importance of “Thank You Song” on this mixtape is obviously to close out the mixtape and kind of sum up all the gratitude that twigs is feeling. It’s very interesting to end on this very slow-tempo ballad, but I think it works because it’s encapsulating everything that the mixtape is about. This mixtape is a journey about her healing and her discovery of herself again.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “THANK YOU SONG”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) Love in motion. My heart’s open. Thank you. Thank you. I’m OK. ‘Cause you care, I made it through today.

HARRIS: I think “Caprisongs” is her most honest and authentic project she’s released. And I think that’s when you really see, like, the heart of her as a musician but as a person as well. It really feels like she’s been able to blossom in her vulnerability and really share that with her listeners.

MARTIN: That was NPR Music’s LaTesha Harris talking about FKA twigs’ new mixtape “Caprisongs,” which is out now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “CARELESS”)

FKA TWIGS: (Singing) You can be careless. You can be careless with me. You can be careless. You can be careless.

Copyright © 2022 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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Grammy-nominated artist Cordae on his latest album, ‘From A Bird’s Eye View’

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Grammy-nominated artist Cordae on his latest album, ‘From A Bird’s Eye View’

NPR’s Scott Simon talks with Grammy-nominated hip-hop artist Cordae about his second full-length album, From A Bird’s Eye View, and the benefits and drawbacks of sudden fame.

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