Archive For November 23, 2018

Music That You Are Grateful For

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Music That You Are Grateful For

We asked All Things Considered listeners to share musicians they’re thankful for in 2018. Brandi Carlile, Lizzo and cello students in Greenfield, Mass., are some of the responses we received.


ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Yesterday on this program, we asked four musicians each to name an artist they are thankful for, and we heard a chain of gratitude, starting with Shoshana Bean, who thanked her idol and friend, Brian McKnight.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

SHOSHANA BEAN: B, I just will never be able to express my gratitude for the opportunities you gave me.

BRIAN MCKNIGHT: There’s a guitar player, Isaiah Sharkey. He is one of the great musicians that I’ve ever heard or been around.

ISAIAH SHARKEY: I am actually thankful for Aniba Hotep. She is absolutely incredible.

ANIBA HOTEP: I’m a huge fan of Lianne La Havas. Thank you for sharing who you are with the world, and thank you for inspiring me to continue to do the same.

SHAPIRO: And then we asked you to tell us the artists you’re thankful for this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “BABY DON’T LEAVE ME ALONE WITH MY THOUGHTS”)

LAKE STREET DIVE: (Singing) Hard times, hard times, when I really need somebody to hold me tight and tell me I’m strong…

SHAPIRO: Some of you mentioned this band from Boston, Lake Street Dive. We also heard votes for California rapper Anderson .Paak.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “THE CHASE”)

ANDERSON .PAAK: (Rapping) You know I hit it almost every time, and then I miss one. How are we going to get ourselves up out of this one? Hard to get up from this like Sonny Liston. Feel like Isiah and Laimbeer with the Pistons. Bad boys…

SHAPIRO: Claire Swindell from Tallahassee, Fla., gave us two reasons she’s thankful for Brandi Carlile.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “PARTY OF ONE”)

BRANDI CARLILE: (Singing) And, girl, you can slam the door behind you. It ain’t ever going to close…

SHAPIRO: First, she says, Carlile supports up-and-coming artists. Second, there’s the message in Carlile’s new album “By The Way, I Forgive You.”

CLAIRE SWINDELL: It’s all about the power of saying the things that aren’t easy and reaching out and forgiving people even when that’s kind of the hard thing to do.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “PARTY OF ONE”)

CARLILE: (Singing) I don’t want to go home anymore. I don’t want to throw stones anymore.

SHAPIRO: For Dallas Lyn Miller of Portland, Ore., it’s all about Lizzo. She says the alternative hip-hop musician has helped her through some tough times.

DALLAS LYN MILLER: The message in there is all about taking care of yourself. And I like to say it’s about filling your own cup first.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “WATER ME”)

LIZZO: (Singing) Love you so, but if you don’t, I have to leave, oh, no.

MILLER: I look up to someone like her that has a message where it’s just so powerful and inspiring for everyone to have fun and love who you are and embrace who you are. So I would just – I would want to thank her for being a voice for everyone.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “WATER ME”)

LIZZO: (Singing) Get up.

SHAPIRO: Finally, Samantha Wood told us she’s thankful for some musicians you may not have heard of yet. She directs Artspace, a community arts center in Greenfield, Mass. She’s grateful for the students who take lessons there.

SAMANTHA WOOD: Especially the youngest ones who practice and quietly work away and sometimes never understand the beauty that they’re contributing to our community until they come together and play in a group for a concert.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS’ “THE IMPERIAL MARCH (DARTH VADER’S THEME)”)

SHAPIRO: That’s “The Imperial March” usually heard when Darth Vader is around. On so many cellos, it has never sounded quite so ominous and yet so full of promise. Thanks to everyone who wrote in to tell us about the musicians that make you feel thankful.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS’ “THE IMPERIAL MARCH (DARTH VADER’S THEME)”)

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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Calculating The Brexit Arithmetic

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Calculating The Brexit Arithmetic

This weekend, the European Union’s 27 nations vote on the Brexit agreement negotiated with the United Kingdom. The next big hurdle is the British Parliament.


ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This weekend marks a major step in Britain’s more than two-year journey to leave the European Union. The EU’s remaining 27 nations will vote on a divorce agreement with the United Kingdom. And for more, we turn to NPR’s Frank Langfitt in London. Hi, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

SHAPIRO: How is this vote likely to go in Brussels – any chance of a defeat?

LANGFITT: I think people would be really surprised if there were a defeat. You know, there are complaints about it. Spain is threatening to vote against it because they have a dispute with the United Kingdom over Gibraltar. Britain has ruled Gibraltar for several centuries. But the sense is the European Union is generally getting most of what it wants out of this, and it’s expected to pass there on Sunday.

SHAPIRO: OK, but then it has to get through the British Parliament.

LANGFITT: Yes.

SHAPIRO: And it faces a much steeper climb there. Tell us about how it’s looking.

LANGFITT: It’s totally different over here in the British Parliament. And the numbers are bad right now, as far as anybody can tell. May’s Conservative Party doesn’t even have a parliamentary majority here, so they don’t have enough votes of their own to do it. I was speaking to a guy named Stephen Bush. He writes for the New Statesman. It’s a left-leaning political magazine here. And he’s a top political journalist. And this is what he said.

STEPHEN BUSH: She’s 72 votes down before you kind of factor in the fact that the opposition parties will all vote against. So she is well adrift and on course for quite a big defeat as it stands.

SHAPIRO: So objections from the left and the right, from her own party and outside of her party.

LANGFITT: Indeed.

SHAPIRO: What happens if it fails?

LANGFITT: Well, this is really interesting. Some people in her own party, Brexiteers, they would love to go back to Brussels and try to get this deal tweaked. But Brussels is not in the mood to make changes. They’ve been negotiating over this for a ton of time, and they’re kind of tired of it. Some people here have been talking about a pretty interesting scenario that will sound familiar to Americans. They are saying in recent U.S. history there’s something that could be relevant. You remember in 2008 the U.S. global financial crisis. There was this Troubled Asset Relief Program, TARP, which we all covered. This was going to have the government buy all these toxic assets for hundreds of billions of dollars. Well, Congress initially voted it down. Markets crashed. And even though Congress didn’t like it, they passed it later kind of in a panic.

SHAPIRO: Right.

LANGFITT: Now, the thought is there could be a market crash here that could push members of Parliament to change their mind. But it’s not clear because most people don’t expect this thing to pass in the first place.

SHAPIRO: Remind us why British leaders of so many different political stripes hate this deal.

LANGFITT: Well, they hate it because it comes down to the Irish border. At a certain point, when the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, it will create the need for a border on the island of Ireland between Northern Ireland, which is a part of the U.K., and the Republic of Ireland that is part of the EU. And basically what the EU is saying is, you can’t leave until we solve this problem. And Brexiteers are saying, gosh, it could take forever to get a new trade deal. We are not sure how to solve the problem exactly. So we could be stuck in the EU for years.

SHAPIRO: Could Theresa May’s political career survive having this voted down in Parliament?

LANGFITT: Well, normally a prime minister, Ari, as you know, here would have to resign. But since the Brexit vote in 2016, the normal rules definitely do not apply to British politics anymore. Stephen Bush, that journalist I was talking to, thinks that she actually may just keep coming back to Parliament until she gets the answer she wants. This is how he put it.

BUSH: I suspect that what might have to happen is you have a defeat everyone expects, another vote where people kind of expect it to be fine when it’s not fine. And then perhaps at that point, you get the necessary panic.

SHAPIRO: Theresa May has been in such an odd position for the last two years implementing or trying to implement this policy that she was not a supporter of before she became prime minister.

LANGFITT: No, exactly.

SHAPIRO: How has she managed to survive through all of this?

LANGFITT: You know, it’s remarkable to watch her. She gets a lot of criticism here, but she just doesn’t quit. Nobody seems to be able – they try to beat her down. It doesn’t really work. There have been a number of memes out that depict her as the Black Knight in “Monty Python And The Holy Grail.” This is the knight that keeps losing limbs and keeps fighting on, saying it’s just a scratch.

SHAPIRO: Yeah.

LANGFITT: And Stephen Bush, the journalist I was talking to, he says this has been her style for a long time.

BUSH: She would effectively just gradually exhaust her way to victory. That’s effectively Theresa May’s political approach. Just keep on, you know, pootling along and wait for your opponents to wear themselves out.

SHAPIRO: Pootling along.

LANGFITT: Pootling along – and I should add one other thing here that the prime minister has going for her. If this all falls apart, the United Kingdom could leave the European Union with no deal at all, which most people think would be economically disastrous. And it would be seen globally as a huge self-inflicted wound. So there is a worst-case scenario that she’s – you know, and she stands between the United Kingdom and that scenario. The other thing is that when you listen to all of her opponents, none of them have a better idea honestly for leaving the EU. It’s a bad situation. But she does have, in some respects, a relatively strong position.

SHAPIRO: NPR’s Frank Langfitt in London, thank you.

LANGFITT: Happy to do it, Ari.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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Bus Overturns Carrying University Of Washington Marching Band

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Bus Overturns Carrying University Of Washington Marching Band

Dozens of members of the University of Washington marching band, shown here in 2017, were transported to hospitals after a bus overturned on Thursday.

Christopher Mast/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images


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Christopher Mast/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

Dozens of people have been hospitalized after a charter bus transporting members of the University of Washington marching band rolled on a Washington interstate Thursday, according to Washington State Patrol.

Trooper John Bryant said “40-45 plus” people were transported to hospitals but that none of the injuries were serious. He said there were 56 people total on the bus.

“The injuries reported were cuts, complaints of general pain and back pain, but the injuries are not believed to be critical,” UW spokesperson Victor Balta said in a statement. “The University is doing everything it can to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff, and to get them back on their journey to Pullman.”

The Husky Marching Band was headed to Eastern Washington to perform at Friday’s Apple Cup football game between Washington and Washington State.

#Update: Again, No Serious Injuries. About 20-25 student (UW Band Members) transported to local hospitals as a precaution. The other students & staff were sent on the other charter buses to George Elementary school. They will also be checked out by medics. 56 total on the bus. pic.twitter.com/bTOtFcCo4U

— Trooper John Bryant (@wspd6pio) November 23, 2018

According to Bryant, the bus rolled at about 5:30 p.m. local time and was one of six carrying UW band members.

It wasn’t immediately clear why the bus rolled over, though Bryant warned incoming media members to drive carefully because the road was icy. He shared photos from the scene of the overturned bus, with the bumper partially ripped off and misshapen front window frames.

Bryant initially said 20 to 25 band members were transported to hospitals, but raised that number about two hours later.

The band members who were uninjured regrouped at an elementary school in the small town of George, Wash., where they received a warm welcome from the local community. One member of the band group said in a post on Twitter, “families left their thanksgiving dinners to bring us leftovers and hot food.”

Husky band bus rolled on the way to Pullman. We’re fine, but shaken up and holed up in an elementary school to regroup. A radio station put out a call and the town of George answered: families left their thanksgiving dinners to bring us leftovers and hot food. pic.twitter.com/Dko6bW7hQa

— Patrick (@patstant) November 23, 2018

The people in George rallying to help the band even included fans of their rivals from Washington State University, according to a tweet from UW Cheer.

Thank you to the local community from around George, WA for rallying behind our band and cheer members tonight by bringing them Thanksgiving dinner. A special shoutout to all of the @WSUCougars fans who keep coming in and bringing food! 👊

— UW Cheer (@UW_Spirit) November 23, 2018

The band has not officially said whether they plan to perform at the Friday evening game. But if they do, the opposing WSU Marching Band is asking their own fans to give the band a warm welcome.

“If the wonderful @huskyband is able to come down tomorrow after tonight’s accident, DO NOT boo those kids,” WSU Marching Band said in a tweet. “Applaud their efforts and sacrifice to be here supporting their team and university.”

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'The Window' Showcases The Wide-Ranging Talent Of Singer Cécile McLorin Salvant

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'The Window' Showcases The Wide-Ranging Talent Of Singer Cécile McLorin Salvant

McLorin Salvant’s powerful voice takes center state on her new album, a duo with pianist Sullivan Fortner. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead says the music on The Window is riveting.

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Protesters Across France Oppose Plans To Raise Gas Prices

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Protesters Across France Oppose Plans To Raise Gas Prices

Paris is bracing for major protests this weekend. Demonstrators in fluorescent yellow vests are threatening to block the French city over a gas tax hike.

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